Winter Term 2018/19

Vorlesung / Lecture Course: “British Literature and Culture, 1895-1953”

 

Joachim Frenk

Zeit: Di, 14.15–15.45 Uhr

Ort: B2 2, Hörsaal I

Erste Vorlesung: 16. Oktober 2018

Die Anmeldung findet im Rahmen des allgemeinen Verfahrens der Fachrichtung 4.3 statt. Bitte beachten Sie die Mitteilungen auf der Website der Fachrichtung und die Aushänge.

The time span we will discuss in this lecture course was turbulent and violent. In the field of literature, it led to an enormous diversity of experiments and writing styles. From late Victorian and Edwardian visions of the future to the aftermath of World War II, these few decades were replete with ruptures on all cultural levels. In this lecture course, we will both closely read canonical texts and look at selected literary and cultural contexts. Among the topics to be discussed are: the synchronicity of the old and the new, the late colonialism, diverse ‘isms’ within the project of modernism, war literature, the fragmented individual, changes in narrative techniques, formal experiments in poetry, old and new roles of art, changes of sex / sexualities / gender, generic innovations, the intermedial dialogue between literature and film. Among the authors to be discussed are: H. G. Wells, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Conrad, George Bernard Shaw, Robert Graves, Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, R. C. Sherriff, Vera Brittain, Virginia Woolf, William Butler Yeats, T. S. Eliot, James Joyce, D. H. Lawrence, E. M. Forster, W. H. Auden, Stephen Spender, Louis MacNeice, Aldous Huxley, Agatha Christie, Evelyn Waugh, Noël Coward, George Orwell, Graham Greene, Dylan Thomas.

There will be a final test (45 mins) in the second half of the last lecture (5th of February, 2019).

Texts:

Stephen Greenblatt et al., eds. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Tenth Edition. Package 2: Volumes D, E, F. New York: Norton, 2018.  ISBN 978-0-393-60313-2

NB: For this lecture course, you will need volumes E (only briefly) and, mostly, F. You will be able to use these volumes also in other courses. The anthology should be available at Bock & Seip on campus before the start of the new term

Hauptseminar (MA: Advanced Topics): “Contemporary Irish Novels and Films

Joachim Frenk

Zeit: Mo, 14.15-15.45

Abschließende Blockveranstaltung: 19. Januar 2019 (Samstag), 11.00-17.00

Ort: C5 3, 1.20

Die Anmeldung findet im Rahmen des allgemeinen Verfahrens der Fachrichtung 4.3 statt. Bitte beachten Sie die Mitteilungen auf der Website der Fachrichtung und die Aushänge. 

Ireland is a fascinating island harbouring two states. Over the last thirty years, among other developments, it has witnessed a peace agreement many thought impossible and an unparalleled economic boom and bust. In the twentieth century, no less than four Nobel Prizes in Literature have been awarded to Irish writers, and the number of contemporary Irish artists that have achieved world fame is truly astonishing for an island that holds little more than 6.2 million people. In this seminar, we will look at a range of recent literary texts (poems, a novel and a play) and two films that represent Irish culture and history in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. We will be able to discuss Irish matters with two Irish artists: playwright Marina Carr (21 Nov 2018) and filmmaker Maurice Fitzpatrick (19 Jan 2019).

 

Texts:

Most texts will be made available, and we will watch one feature film and one documentary together. You must own and read:

Claire Kilroy, The Devil I Know. London: Faber & Faber, 2012.   ISBN 978-0-5712-8343-9

The book should be available at Bock & Seip on campus before the start of the new term.

 

 

Examenskolloquium


Joachim Frenk


Zeit: Mo, 10.15-11.45 Uhr

Ort: C5 3, 1.20

Erste Sitzung des wöchentlichen Kolloquiums: 22. Oktober 2018

Sitzungen des Block-Kolloquium (für mündliche Examenskandidat_innen im Frühling 2019): Freitag, 5. April 2019, 10.00-18.00

Die Anmeldung findet im Rahmen des allgemeinen Verfahrens der Fachrichtung statt. Bitte beachten Sie die Mitteilungen auf der Website der Fachrichtung und die Aushänge.

 

Das Examenskolloquium ist unterteilt in zwei Teile:

a.) ein wöchentliches Kolloquium, das in Einzelsitzungen stattfindet

b.) ein Block-Kolloquium.

 

zu a.): Die Einzelsitzungen an den Montagen der Vorlesungszeit, die nicht jede Woche stattfinden werden, sind in erster Linie für BA-, MA- und Lehramts-Kandidat_innen gedacht, die schriftliche Abschlussarbeiten anfertigen und dabei betreut werden. Bitte melden Sie sich nach Möglichkeit vor der ersten Sitzung (22. Oktober 2016) bei Frau Plach an (c.plach@mx.uni-saarland.de).

 

zu b.): Das Block-Kolloquium richtet sich in erster Linie an die Kandidatinnen und Kandidaten der mündlichen Prüfungen im Frühling 2019. Im Block-Kolloquium tragen die Kandidat_innen je ca. 15-20 Minuten über ihre Prüfungsthemen vor. Der Vortrag wird im Plenum diskutiert. Sollten Sie weitere Fragen haben, kommen Sie bitte in eine meiner Sprechstunden.

Forschungskolloquium

 

Joachim Frenk

Zeit: Mo, 16.15-17.45 Uhr

Ort: C5 3, 1.19

Erste Sitzung: 22. Oktober 2018

Bitte melden Sie sich für dieses Kolloquium bei Frau Plach (c.plach@mx.uni-saarland.de) oder bei Prof. Frenk (frenk@mx.uni-saarland.de) an.

In this colloquium, ongoing research projects will be discussed. In addition, we will also discuss verbal and visual texts we find interesting.

Texts:

To be discussed. In most cases, required texts will be made available via moodle or as handouts.

 

 

Hauptseminar: "Tempests"

 

Lena Steveker

Zeit: Di, 10.15-11.45 Uhr

Ort: C5 3, U13

Erste Sitzung: 11. April 2018

The Tempest is probably the last single-authored play Shakespeare wrote before he retired as a playwright. Lyrical, metatheatrical, and packed with magic, The Tempest has inspired numerous adaptations across various cultural practices throughout the centuries. In this seminar, we will read The Tempest and discuss its particularities and complexities as an early modern play; we will then turn to various adaptations of the play in paint, in film, on stage and in fiction. We will focus on how these adaptations rework Shakespeare’s play for their own cultural purposes. 

 

Texts: Students must own the following editions:

Shakespeare, William. The Tempest. Ed. Virginia Mason Vaughan and Alden T. Vaughan. Revised edition. New York: Bloomsbury, 2011. The Arden Shakespeare. 

Césaire, Aimé. A Tempest. Transl. Richard Miller. New York: Theatre Communications Group, 2007.

Atwood, Margaret. Hag-Seed. London: Vintage, 2017. 

The books should be available at Bock & Seip on campus before the start of the new term.

 

 

Übung: CS II Media Studies

 

Lena Steveker

Zeit: Mo, 14.15-16.45 Uhr

Ort: B4 1, 0.02.1

Erste Sitzung: 22. Oktober 2018

 

Die Anmeldung findet im Rahmen des allgemeinen Verfahrens der Fachrichtung 4.3 statt. Bitte beachten Sie die Mitteilungen auf der Website der Fachrichtung und die Aushänge.

Putting a particularly strong focus on film studies, this course will introduce you to various aspects of media history, media theory and media analysis. We are going to discuss texts on media/film theory and criticism, and we will analyse films. We will focus on filmic negotiations of Britishness in various forms. Reading texts and watching films in preparation for each class is obligatory for all students who would like to participate in this course.  

 

In order to gain credit for this course, students will have to do a case study (group work) which they will have to present in class.

 

 

 

Proseminar: “ʻSpirit to Spirit, Ghost to Ghost’: Death and the Cultures of Mourning in the Victorian Age”

 

Sanja Bentz

Zeit: Mo, 12.15-13.45 Uhr

Ort: C5 3, U13

Erste Sitzung: 15. April 2019

 

Die Anmeldung findet im Rahmen des allgemeinen Verfahrens der Fachrichtung 4.3 statt. Bitte beachten Sie die Mitteilungen auf der Website der Fachrichtung und die Aushänge.

 

In this seminar, we will read and discuss three Victorian examples of death and mourning – they are historical and fictional and they are narrated in different genres. By comparing the three, we will attempt to find common Victorian attitudes towards death and discuss how phenomena such as imperialism, industrialisation and the 'crisis of faith' influenced Victorian cultures of mourning.

 

One of the most consequential deaths of the Victorian Age was the death of Prince Albert, Queen Victoria’s husband, on 14 December 1861. Victoria chose the role of 'the widow of Windsor' for the rest of her life and forced her subjects to accept that a single death would influence the course of the British Empire. We will trace the impact of this death in letters by Queen Victoria and in comments such as newspaper articles and letters by people outside of Windsor.

Shortly after Albert's death, Victoria tried to find comfort in the pain of someone else: Alfred Tennyson. In his long elegy In Memoriam A.H.H. (1850), Tennyson indulges in mourning for his closest friend Arthur Hallam and seeks to understand an age in which religion and the comfort it used to offer were constantly challenged by new scientific discoveries.

Our third example will be Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights, which was published in 1848. It was published in the Victorian age, but scholars have struggled to read it as a Victorian novel. We will analyse the novel’s depictions of death and suffering in order to see if and how it challenges Victorian cultures of mourning.

 

Texts:

All students must use the following editions for this seminar (both editions will be available at Bock & Seip on campus before the start of the new term):

 

Brontë, Emily. Wuthering Heights. Ed. Richard J. Dunn. Norton, 2002. ISBN: 978-0393978896

 

Tennyson, Alfred. Selected Poems. Ed. Christopher Ricks. Penguin, 2007. ISBN: 978-0140424430


Excerpts of the relevant letters will be provided.

 

 

Proseminar: “The First Wave of Feminism: Suffragettes, New Women, and other Rebels”

 

Heike Mißler

Zeit: Di, 16.15-17.45 Uhr

Ort: C5 3, U13

Erste Sitzung: 16. Oktober 2018

 

Die Anmeldung findet im Rahmen des allgemeinen Verfahrens der Fachrichtung 4.3 statt. Bitte beachten Sie die Mitteilungen auf der Website der Fachrichtung und die Aushänge.

 

“Be militant each in your own way. […] I incite this meeting to rebellion!” (Emmeline Pankhurst, 1912)

 

2018 marks the centenary of the Representation of the People Act, which gave women (who were older than thirty) the right to vote in the UK. This course will introduce you to the (sometimes violent) struggle for female enfranchisement, which is frequently remembered as the main aim of the so-called first wave of feminism. However, these women and men were not just fighting for a fundamental political right, but for far-reaching social changes. The texts discussed in class cover issues ranging from marriage, sexual and reproductive rights, and access to education and professional careers, to everyday-life concerns such as the right to dress sensibly, to smoke, to ride a bicycle, or play football. In addition to this, we are going to look at how the events of 100 years ago are represented in contemporary popular culture, i.e., in Sarah Gavron’s 2015 film Suffragette, and how they are commemorated and celebrated in the UK this year.

 

Text: Please purchase the following edition of H.G. Wells’s novel and read it before the start of term. All other texts will be made available to you via moodle.

Wells, H. G. Ann Veronica. Edited by Sita Schutt, Penguin, 2005.

ISBN-10: 0141441097

ISBN-13: 978-0141441092

The book should be available at Bock & Seip on campus before the start of the new term.

Übung “Introduction to Cultural Studies UK and Ireland”

 

Heike Mißler

Zeit: Mi, 16.15-17.45 Uhr

Ort: B3 1, HS I

Erste Sitzung: 17. Oktober 2018

 

Die Anmeldung findet im Rahmen des allgemeinen Verfahrens der Fachrichtung 4.3 statt. Bitte beachten Sie die Mitteilungen auf der Website der Fachrichtung und die Aushänge.

 

This course provides an introduction to the study of British and Irish culture(s) in the widest sense of the term. This will include cultural texts such as literature, film, television and music, as well as the culture of everyday life. Rather than just stating facts and figures, it will give you an overview of the history of ideas and movements in the UK and Ireland, ranging from the divine right of kings to girl power. Exploring the links between culture and identity, we will examine the powerful, yet volatile, construct of Britishness and how it has been challenged throughout the centuries by forces from without and within.

 

 Texts:

 

A course reader will be made available to you on moodle at the beginning of the semester.

 

 

 

 

CS II Übung: Introduction to Media Studies: “Recreating the Elizabethan Age for the Screen: Elizabeth I and William Shakespeare”

 

Christine Moyrer

Zeiten dieser Blockveranstaltung:

Fr, 05.10., 12h-14h;

Sa, 13.10., 10h-16h15

Sa, 20.10.,   9h-17h15;

Sa, 27.10., 9h-17h15

Sa, 24.11., 10h-14h30;

Sa, 30.11., Klausur, 10-12h

Ort: C5 3, 4.08

Die Anmeldung findet im Rahmen des allgemeinen Verfahrens der Fachrichtung 4.3 statt. Bitte beachten Sie die Mitteilungen auf der Website der Fachrichtung und die Aushänge.

This course will introduce you to various aspects of media history, media theory and media analysis. We are going to discuss texts on media/film theory and criticism, and we will critically analyse various media products, such as early modern paintings, film sequences and individual episodes from select TV series. Reading texts and/or watching films/TV series in preparation for each class will therefore be obligatory for all students in this course.

In our case studies, we will focus on the media afterlives of Elizabeth I (1533-1603) and William Shakespeare (1564-1616), two of the most iconic figures to have left their traces on English national and cultural identity. In the collective cultural memory, the reign of Elizabeth I often figures as the Golden Age, which saw Protestantism firmly take roots on English soil, the emergence of a fledgling sense of national identity, and an unprecedented flowering of the arts and literature.

The name of William Shakespeare is indissolubly linked to this flowering of literature during the Elizabethan Age. The very name of “the Bard” has come to equate outstanding literary achievements, exuberant creativity and enduring stories that have haunted us to the present day, in comic strips, movies, television adaptations and many other media products.

We will examine how various media types at distinct cultural moments have engaged with Elizabeth I and William Shakespeare and how these media and their specific medialities produce cultural and artistic meaning(s) which continue to resonate with twenty-first-century audiences.

Please note: In order to attend this course, students must register before the beginning of term. To get credit points for this course, students will have to write a short ‘think piece’ (1-11/2 pages) during the semester and pass an exam at the end of semester. Regular attendance will be expected.

Texts:

Texts will be made available on moodle.